CRISIS HOSTAGE NEGOTIATIONS – Level I (Basic)

The first in a series of progressive courses, CSM’s Crisis Hostage Negotiations – Level I Basic addresses the fundamental needs of a successful crisis negotiator.  This course will prepare you to work as part of a coordinated negotiation team and handle a variety of crisis situations including hostage takers, barricaded subjects, and potential suicide victims.

You will learn the different phases of the negotiation process, from the introduction to the surrender, and specific strategies and techniques to be used along the way. We will discuss when negotiation may not be the best solution, what items are negotiable and non-negotiable, and what to do in non-response situations.

The management of intelligence and information is a critical aspect of mitigating any law enforcement threat and you will learn specific techniques for managing the flow of information during a crisis.

You will also gain a basic understanding of the psychological motivations of persons in crisis and learn to recognize the characteristics of emotionally disturbed persons. You will learn about the personality disorders which are most commonly encountered during a crisis incident as well as strategies for affecting a positive outcome.

Challenging, team-oriented, scenario-driven practical exercises are an integral part of the course and will allow you the opportunity to practice and refine your crisis negotiation skills.

TOPICS INCLUDE:
Introduction to Crisis Negotiation
Pre-incident Planning
Effective Communication I
Command Response
Negotiating as a Team
Principles of Crisis Negotiation
Phases of the Negotiation
Abnormal Psychology for Crisis Negotiators
Anti-social Personality Disorder
Borderline Personality Disorder
Paranoid Personality Disorder
Avoidant/Dependent Personality Disorders
Suicide Intervention for Law Enforcement
Debriefing and Record Keeping

PREREQUISITES: You must be a sworn member of law enforcement or corrections, a non-law enforcement member of a crisis negotiation team, or a mental health professional or a clergy member supporting law enforcement activities, to attend this course. Requests for exceptions must be submitted and approved by the course director.

NOTE: This course meets most state and federal training requirements for crisis-hostage negotiator certification, is trained in accordance with guidelines established by the National Council of Negotiation Associations.

(CEH: 18-hours Technical Skill; 8-hours Interpersonal Perspectives; & 14-hours Skill Development.)

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CRISIS HOSTAGE NEGOTIATIONS – Level II (Intermediate)

This course will further enhance the knowledge and skills you acquired in CSM’s Crisis Hostage Negotiations – Basic course, or its 40-hour equivalent.  A more in-depth study of abnormal psychology, high element negotiations, and advanced communication techniques will be a primary focus during the course.

After identifying and assessing your personal listening style, you will learn effective questioning techniques and appropriate responses based on the “clusters of five.” You will learn how to say “no,” how to show empathy and how to develop and apply a communication strategy during a negotiation.

In a continued discussion of abnormal psychology, we will examine additional mental health disorders as they relate to crisis negotiation, including depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. We will examine the Victim Precipitated Homicide and behaviors meant to compel law enforcement to respond with deadly force.

Situations that create unique challenges for law enforcement, such as jumpers from bridges, cell towers and overpasses, will be among the advanced concepts discussed. You will learn how to interpret a crisis and recognize signs that may indicate the immediacy of suicidal intent. And you will learn guidelines for working with rescue personnel at the scene.

In regards to the hostages involved, we will show you how to interpret the behavior of hostages while in captivity and techniques you can use when dealing with them directly. The consideration of hostages when developing a deliberate strategy will be explored.

Challenging, team-oriented, scenario-driven practical exercises are an integral part of the course and will allow you the opportunity to practice and refine your crisis negotiation skills.

TOPICS INCLUDE:
Effective Communication II: Active Listening
Advanced Communication Techniques (Questions)
Advanced Communication Techniques (Responses)
Abnormal Psychology II
Victim Precipitated Homicide
Using Third Party Intermediaries and Interpreters
The Hostage Experience

PREREQUISITES: You must be a sworn member of law enforcement or corrections, a non-law enforcement member of a crisis negotiation team, a mental health professional or a clergy member supporting law enforcement activities and have successfully completed CSM’s Crisis Hostage Negotiations – Level I Basic course, or its 40-hour equivalent, prior to attending this course. This class is not recommended for students with no previous negotiation training. Requests for exceptions must be submitted and approved by course director.

(CEH: 16-hours Technical Skill; 10-hours Interpersonal Perspectives; & 14-hours Skill Development.)

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CRISIS HOSTAGE NEGOTIATIONS – Level III (Advanced)

The third in a series of three progressive courses, CSM’s Crisis Hostage Negotiations – Level III (Advanced) prepares you for the most complex and challenging aspects of crisis negotiation – leading crisis negotiation teams and managing crisis incidents. We will take you from policy development, to recruiting, selecting, and training crisis negotiators, to media management, managing legal risk, and managing negotiator stress.

You will learn about current trends with prescription and illegal drug use, characteristics of drug-effected subjects and techniques for communicating with subjects who are under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

In a continued discussion of abnormal psychology, you will learn how to recognize Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and techniques for negotiating with a PTSD-effected subject. Additionally, we will discuss the effects of traumatic brain injury as it relates to a person in crisis.

Finishing up the series of Effective Communication, you will learn to evaluate the verbal content of a person in crisis for the purpose of determining subject motivation and developing an effective communication strategy.

In keeping with the advanced nature of this course, students will plan, facilitate, and evaluate a culminating scenario-driven practical exercise. Student performance will be carefully evaluated and in-depth feedback will be provided during a comprehensive after-action debriefing.

TOPICS INCLUDE:
Negotiating with the Drug-effected Subject
Pre-incident Planning for Team Leaders
Recruiting, Selecting, and Training Crisis Negotiators
Effective Communication III: Evaluating Verbal Content
Abnormal Psychology III: PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury
Managing Legal Risk
Managing the Major Incident

PREREQUISITES: You must be a sworn member of law enforcement or corrections, a non-law enforcement member of a crisis negotiation team, or a mental health professional or a clergy member supporting law enforcement activities, to attend this course. Students attending must have successfully completed CSM’s Crisis Hostage Negotiations – Level I (Basic) course, or its 40-hour equivalent, prior to attending this course. It is recommended that students have successfully completed CSM’s Crisis Hostage Negotiations – Level II (Intermediate) course or its 40-hour equivalent, prior to attending this course. This class is not recommended for students with no previous negotiation training. Requests for exceptions must be submitted and approved by the course director.

NOTE: This course is trained in accordance with guidelines established by the National Council of Negotiation Associations.

(CEH: 14-hours Technical Skill; 7-hours Interpersonal Perspectives; 2-hours Legal Studies & 17-hours Skill Development.)

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CRISIS NEGOTIATION FOR CORRECTIONS

Designed especially for crisis negotiators working in a correctional environment, the emphasis of this course is on the negotiation techniques appropriate for mitigating the unique challenges presented by inmates.

You will work as part of a coordinated negotiation team and handle a variety of crisis situations including hostage takers, barricaded subjects, and potential suicide victims. You will learn the different phases of the negotiation process, from the introduction to the surrender, and specific strategies and techniques to be used along the way. We will discuss when negotiation may not be the best solution, what items are negotiable and non-negotiable, and what to do in non-response situations.

The management of intelligence and information is a critical aspect of mitigating any law enforcement threat. You will learn specific techniques for managing the flow of information during a crisis and how to best leverage information available to corrections negotiators.

You will also gain a basic understanding of the psychological motivations of persons in crisis and learn to recognize the characteristics of emotionally disturbed persons. You will learn about personality disorders most commonly encountered during a crisis incident as well as specific techniques and strategies for affecting a positive outcome.

Challenging, team-oriented, scenario-driven practical exercises based on corrections-oriented incidents will be an integral part of the course and will allow you the opportunity to practice and refine your crisis negotiation skills.

TOPICS INCLUDE:
Introduction and History of Crisis/Hostage Negotiation in Corrections
Pre-incident Planning for Negotiating in Corrections
Effective Communication
Negotiating in a Corrections Environment
Phases of Negotiation
Intelligence Management
Negotiating as a Team
Principles of Negotiation
Abnormal Psychology
The Hostage Experience
Special Problems in Corrections

PREREQUISITES: You must be a sworn member of law enforcement or corrections, a non-law enforcement member of a crisis negotiation team, or a mental health professional or a clergy member supporting law enforcement or corrections activities to attend this class. This course is not recommended for negotiators without a corrections affiliation. Requests for exceptions must be submitted and approved by the course director.

NOTE: This basic course meets most state and federal training requirements for crisis-hostage negotiator certification, is trained in accordance with guidelines established by the National Council of Negotiation Associations.

(CEH: 18-hours Technical Skill; 8-hours Interpersonal Perspectives; & 14-hours Skill Development.)

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CRISIS/HOSTAGE NEGOTIATION Level I-60 (Department of Defense)

Prepared especially for the Department of Defense audience, this 60-hour course addresses the contemporary topics related to the challenge of negotiating with combat veterans as well as negotiating with structured and security threat groups. You will learn the fundamental needs of a successful crisis negotiator in a variety of environments related to Department of Defense activities including Detainee Operations, Force Protection, Corrections, and Law Enforcement Operations.

We will prepare you to work as part of a coordinated negotiation team and handle a variety of crisis situations including hostage takers, barricaded subjects, and potential suicide victims. You will learn the different phases of the negotiation process, from the introduction to the surrender, and specific strategies and techniques to be used along the way. 

We will discuss when negotiation may not be the best solution, what items are negotiable and non-negotiable, and what to do in non-response situations. You will learn effective questioning techniques and appropriate responses based on the “clusters of five.” You will learn how to say “no,” how to show empathy, and how to develop and apply a communication strategy during a negotiation.

The management of intelligence and information is a critical aspect of mitigating any law enforcement threat and you will learn specific techniques for managing the flow of information during a crisis. You will also gain a basic understanding of the psychological motivations of persons in crisis and learn to recognize the characteristics of emotionally disturbed persons. We will discuss the personality disorders most commonly encountered during a crisis incident as well as strategies for affecting a positive outcome.

Challenging, team-oriented, scenario-driven practical exercises are an integral part of the course and will allow you the opportunity to practice and refine your crisis negotiation skills.

TOPICS INCLUDE:
Introduction and History of Crisis/Hostage Negotiation
Pre-incident Planning for Negotiators
Effective Communication
Command Response
Phases of Negotiation
Intelligence Management
Negotiating as a Team
Principles of Negotiation
Abnormal Psychology
Anti-social Personality Disorder
Borderline Personality Disorder
Paranoid Personality Disorder
Avoidant/Dependent Personality Disorder
Negotiating with Combat Veterans
Negotiating with Structured Groups (Terrorists and Security Threat Groups)
Using Third Party Intermediaries and Interpreters
Advanced Communication Techniques (Questions)
Advanced Communication Techniques (Responses)
Debriefing and Record Keeping

PREREQUISITES: You must be an Active Duty/Reserve member of the U.S. Armed Forces or a Department of Defense civilian or contractor working in support of law enforcement or security activities within Department of Defense. Requests for exceptions must be submitted and approved by course director.

NOTE: This basic course meets most state and federal training requirements for crisis-hostage negotiator certification, is trained in accordance with guidelines established by the National Council of Negotiation Associations.

This course is available as a mobile training team course worldwide and may be customized in accordance with operational requirements.

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NEGOTIATING WITH SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Negotiating with terrorists, the elderly, combat veterans, fellow officers, inmates and troubled youth present a unique set of challenges for a negotiator. In this advanced course designed specifically for experienced negotiators, you will learn proven methods for dealing with these people in crisis.

SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1There are as many different psychologies, motivations, and decision-making structures as there are types of terrorists. We will discuss the psychology of sub-state terrorism including Right-Wing, Social Revolutionary, National Separatist, Religious Extremist and Single-Issue terrorists. You will learn techniques for negotiating with both leaders and followers of a structured group during planned and unplanned incidents. We will also present an overview of security threats groups within the United States as well effective techniques for negotiation.
Murder/suicide and suicide among the elderly are one of the fastest growing law enforcement problems in the United States. You will learn the sociological and psychological effects of aging, depression and the elderly, and techniques for generational communication.
Adolescents experience mental health issues unique to their emotional and sociological development and you will learn how these issues differ from those of an adult. You will also gain a basic understanding of the psychological motivations of an adolescent in crisis and learn to recognize the characteristics of an emotionally disturbed youth.

A suicidal adolescent who makes a decision to commit suicide at school presents a risk to both peers and faculty. You will learn to identify indicators of the immediacy of suicide intent as well as procedures for ensuring the safety of others. We will also discuss the psychological and sociological aspects of the “Classroom Avenger” with special emphasis on negotiation techniques.

The availability of relevant intelligence, mental health assessments, facilities data, and the accountability of the inmate population are among a few of the advantages we will discuss in a corrections versus community discussion. Assessing threats, determining motivation, and developing a strategy are among other topics discussed.

Underestimating the threat, putting the wrong person on the phone, and the “Rescue Dynamic,” all have a negative impact on crisis incidents involving fellow officers. We will talk about these issues and more in our discussion of “negotiating with fellow officers.”

PTSD and the high suicide rate within Department of Defense demand a closer look at the law enforcement response to a veteran in crisis. We will explore, in-depth, the psychological wounds of veterans as it relates to crisis negotiation as well as specific negotiations strategies for mitigation.

You will gain a better understanding of each of the selected populations from both the psychological and sociological perspectives. More importantly, you will learn specific communication and negotiation strategies for mitigating a crisis.

TOPICS INCLUDE:
Negotiating with Structured Groups (Terrorists and Security Threat Groups)
Negating with the Elderly
Negotiating with Troubled Youth
Negotiating with Inmates
Negotiating with Fellow Officers
Negotiating with Combat Veterans

PREREQUISITES: You must be a sworn member of law enforcement or corrections, a non-law enforcement member of a crisis negotiation team, a mental health professional or a clergy member supporting law enforcement activities and have completed CSM’s Crisis Hostage Negotiations – Level I (Basic) course, or an equivalent 40-hour crisis negotiation course, prior to attending this class. Requests for exceptions must be submitted and approved by the course director.

NOTE: This course alone does not meet state and federal training requirements for crisis-hostage negotiator certification; however, it is intended as an advanced/ refresher for previously trained and experienced negotiators.

(CEH: 24-hours Interpersonal Perspectives)

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NEGOTIATING IN A SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT

This unique 3-day course will prepare the experienced crisis negotiator to deal with the very contemporary and relevant topic of adolescents who present a threat in a school environment by taking hostages or attempting to commit suicide.

We will explore current school violence trends throughout the U.S. and the role law enforcement plays in mitigating future threats. To better understand how negotiators must coordinate their efforts with first responders and tactical teams, you will receive an overview of the tactical response in a school environment with special emphasis on low- and mid-level threats. You will also learn how to work collaboratively with school officials when organizing a school response.

Adolescents experience mental health issues unique to their emotional and sociological development and you will learn how these issues differ from those of an adult. You will also gain a basic understanding of the psychological motivations of an adolescent in crisis and learn to recognize the characteristics of an emotionally disturbed youth. The personality disorders most commonly associated with teens as well as strategies for affecting a positive outcome during a crisis will be explained.

A suicidal adolescent who makes a decision to commit suicide at school presents a risk to both peers and faculty. You will learn to identify indicators of the immediacy of suicide intent as well as procedures for ensuring the safety of others. We will also discuss the psychological and sociological aspects of the “Classroom Avenger” with special emphasis on negotiation techniques.

The course will culminate with one of the program’s most challenging scenario-driven practical exercises allowing you to refine your negotiation team work as well as your own personal negotiation skills.

TOPICS INCLUDE:
Overview of Trends in School Violence
Pre-incident Planning for a School Response
Overview of the Tactical Response
Adolescent Mental Health
Adolescent Suicide
Negotiating with Troubled Youth

PREREQUISITES: You must be a sworn member of law enforcement or juvenile corrections, a non-law enforcement member of a crisis negotiation team, a mental health professional or a clergy member supporting law enforcement or school activities, a school resource officer, or a member of a school staff assigned duties to a crisis incident response team and have successfully completed CSM’s Crisis Hostage Negotiations – Level I (Basic) course, or an equivalent 40-hour crisis negotiation course, to attend this class. Requests for exceptions must be submitted and approved by the course director.

NOTE: This course alone does not meet state and federal training requirements for crisis-hostage negotiator certification; however, it is intended as an advanced/refresher for previously trained and experienced negotiators.

(CEH: 4-hours Technical Skill; 8-hours Interpersonal Perspectives & 4-hours Skill Development.)

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HIGH ELEMENT NEGOTIATION (Advanced/Refresher)

The concept of a person in crisis threatening to jump off a bridge, a building, an overpass or a cell tower is as old as suicide itself. This unique and highly specialized crisis negotiation course takes a fresh approach to an age-old crisis. CSM’s High Element Negotiation Course is intended to provide crisis negotiators with specialized skills for mitigating threats involving high elements.

An overview of High Element Negotiation will begin with the logistical difficulties of dealing with a “jumper”, methods of communication, the importance of isolating the crisis, and the role of drugs and alcohol as it pertains to the “jumper.” You will gain an understanding of the ‘Rescue Dynamic’ experienced by responders and its effects on officer safety.

You will participate in an in-depth discussion about the non-verbal interpretation of a crisis. Topics will include non-verbal characteristics of a person with suicidal intent as well as factors indicating the immediacy of suicidal intent.

Communicating with an emotionally disturbed person presents unique challenges. We will help you navigate your way through receptive and expressive aphasia, delusions, hallucinations, and paranoia with effective techniques for communication.

Suicidal people sometimes chose methods of dying that place others at risk. The decision to use force as a means to resolve a suicidal crisis is a difficult one. We will explore the risk associated with a suicidal crisis as well as action criteria for using force as a means of resolution. We will discuss the inevitable pressure on law enforcement to restore normal activity and the effect it has on decision making.

Fire and rescue personnel have their own rescue doctrine when it comes to dealing with a “jumper.” A procedurally-focused discussion will help you better understand the role of fire and rescue as it pertains to crisis negotiation and clarify where the crisis phase ends and the rescue phase begins.

What role does the tactical team play when dealing with a “jumper”? At what point do we determine we are going to use non-lethal or lethal force to resolve a suicidal crisis? What methods are acceptable for a tactical resolution? You will get the answers to these questions and more during an overview of the tactical response.

Lastly, we will learn the legal risks associated with negotiating a high-element crisis.

The course culminates with challenging high-element negotiation opportunities. Students will apply communication techniques discussed in lecture and will have an opportunity to negotiation from extreme heights.

PREREQUISITES: You must be a sworn member of law enforcement or corrections, a non-law enforcement member of a crisis negotiation team, a mental health professional or a clergy member supporting law enforcement activities and have completed CSM’s Crisis Hostage Negotiations – Level I (Basic) course, or an equivalent 40-hour crisis negotiation course, prior to attending this class. Requests for exceptions must be submitted and approved by the course director.

This course alone does not meet state and federal training requirements for crisis-hostage negotiator certification however, is intended as an advanced/ refresher for previously trained and experienced negotiators.

TOPICS INCLUDE:
Introduction to High Element Negotiation
Interpreting the Crisis
Crisis Communication with the Emotionally Disturbed
Managing the Suicidal Crisis
Working with Rescue Responders
Tactical Overview of the High Element Crisis
Managing Legal Risk

NOTES:
Practical exercises will take place outside regardless of weather conditions and will require negotiation from extreme heights.

This course is available as a mobile training course however, requires the host agancy to coordinate fire academy training facilities.

(CEH:12-hours Technical Skill; 6-hours Interpersonal Perspectives; 2-hours Legal Studies & 4-hours Skill Development.)

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RESPONDING TO THE CHURCH CRISIS

This 8-hour course is the first in a series of courses designed for pastoral leaders and those responsible for safety and security in a church environment. This course will provide you with a comprehensive overview of the important steps in planning for a church crisis, reducing vulnerabilities, mitigating a crisis, and dealing with the aftermath of a crisis.

A historical perspective of church violence over the last decade will illustrate the importance of preparing your ministry for a risk-effective crisis response.

You will learn the basics elements of site and threat assessments and how to use the results of an assessment to reduce vulnerability and implement new standards for safety and security.

We will discuss strategies for improving both individual and organizational awareness and preparedness.

You will also gain a basic understanding of the psychological motivations of persons in crisis and learn to recognize the characteristics of emotionally disturbed persons as well as strategies for affecting a positive outcome.

Communication during a crisis is one of the biggest challenges facing anyone responsible for coordinating a response effort. You will learn basic strategies for effective communication before, during, and after an incident.

A brief overview of the police response will give you an idea of what to expect when the police respond to a crisis as well as tips for building a collaborative relationship with law enforcement.

Lastly, we will discuss the role of church management in dealing with the aftermath of a crisis and the importance of a post-incident strategy.

PREREQUISITES: Although there are no specific requirements for attendance to this course, the information is intended for pastoral leaders, staff, volunteers, and church members involved in planning for the safety and security of a church environment and related activities. Those attendees most responsible for direct mitigation a church crisis are encouraged to attend a more comprehensive 3-day Church Resource Officer Course.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS: Students must participate in 8 hours of lecture discussion in order to receive a certificate of completion.

TOPICS INCLUDE:
Pre-Incident Preparedness
Vulnerability and Site Assessments
Reducing Vulnerability
Implementing new Standards/Strategies
Personal/Organizational Preparedness and Planning
Individual/Staff Awareness
Key Indicators of Danger & Distress
Crisis Communication
Mitigating the Crisis
Identify/Evaluate Risk Factors
T he Police Response
Personal Protection
Crisis Recovery
Critical Incident Stress Debriefing
Re-evaluation of Security/Response Protocols

PRESENTED BY:
Mr. Rex Scism and Ms. Deborah McMahon have more than 50-years of combined law enforcement experience including extensive specialized experience in crisis incident planning and management and workplace violence.

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